While I've been happily shooting film for most of my life, I understood the need to jump into digital - the places where I usually get my film processed were disappearing. My first digital camera was a Nikon Coolpix S6 - a camera with one of the first implementations of a touchscreen and really iffy wifi connectivity.

The Nikon Coolpix S6 point-and-shoot. While it had no manual settings, it took excellent pictures - as long as you weren't indoors.

The Nikon Coolpix S6 point-and-shoot. While it had no manual settings, it took excellent pictures - as long as you weren't indoors.

It was purchased to serve as an introduction to digital photography for me as the little camera was more about style than substance. It was a six megapixel bundle of fun that was was small enough to put into my pocket, so it went with me everywhere. Walking around town. On vacation. To the local coffee shop. It was small, compact, and adequate for my needs at the time. It reminded me of the fun I used to have when my dad introduced me to photography with the Canon FTb. All that fun, without the hassle of limiting yourself to 24 or 36 exposures. More importantly, there was no waiting for processing, printing or scanning. I quickly reached its limitations and even managed to push the little camera beyond its capabilities through really heavy editing in Photoshop and Lightroom. I didn’t care though - I was having too much fun. Ten years ago, before the age of selfies and the ubiquitous smart phone, this camera was the most compact you could buy that offered reasonable image quality.

Images from the S6 were bright and punchy - I consistently had to tone them down in Photoshop or Lightroom.

Images from the S6 were bright and punchy - I consistently had to tone them down in Photoshop or Lightroom.

The cliché shot of the Porsche crest covered in and surrounded by water droplets.

The cliché shot of the Porsche crest covered in and surrounded by water droplets.

After reaching the limits of the little Coolpix, I decided to get a digital SLR - similar to the Canons of my past. In researching the DSLRs, I found them quite big, bulky and unwieldy. At this point, I was used to the compactness and the go-anywhere size of the point-and-shoot and since this was only my first foray into digital photography, I was reluctant to take the plunge without further research.

At this time (2009-2010) there was a lot of buzz in the photo industry about the new micro four thirds format (M43) being manufactured by both Olympus and Panasonic. Upon investigation, I fell in love with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2. While technically not a DSLR (more like a mirrorless camera that looked like a DSLR), It offered a reasonably compact physical format along with a bigger (than my point-and-shoot) sensor and the ability to change lenses. 

My first interchangeable lens digital camera (ILC) - the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 with the LUMIX G VARIO 14-42/F3.5-5.6 kit lens.

My first interchangeable lens digital camera (ILC) - the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 with the LUMIX G VARIO 14-42/F3.5-5.6 kit lens.

After the getting-to-know period, I decided to see what the little Panasonic was capable of and tested it on a more formalized photoshoot. I used my car as the subject and drove it to an underground parkade. 

The grunginess of the garage added to look of the car.

The grunginess of the garage added to look of the car.

A wider view with more grunge.

A wider view with more grunge.

The obligatory badge shot.

The obligatory badge shot.

Digital Photography - Blog Post

I was worried that the cropped sensor would be a handicap in really dim light, but I shoot mostly static objects and landscapes on a tripod, so I was quite happy with the results. I have since purchased a newer Olympus OMD-EM5 body, a few more lenses and am happily snapping away.

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